Friday, February 8, 2008

John McCain proves that maybe conservative talk radio isn't the power we thought it was?











As I listen to the conservative talk radio pundits( and I use the term loosely) this week as they try to deal with John McCain becoming the frontrunner for the Republican party, I've had a great relief.

Maybe these divisive showboaters and blowhards, who claim to represent great masses, really aren't as powerful as they think--and I worry-- they are.

Think about it: Rush Limbaugh spent weeks slamming McCain and praising Mitt Romney. Sean Hannity and Bill O'Reilly and the whole Fox network bowed at the feet of "America's Mayor" Rudy Giulliani.

Michael Savage, who reads Bible passages on the air and tries to hide the fact that he's Jewish, should have been behind Huckabee, but was a Romney supporter.

Ann Coulter, who never met a truth she could wrap her lips around, said that if the party goes with McCain, she'd support Hillary.

Most of the others, who are little more than imitators, followed the same party line: McCain is too liberal and wants to reach out to Democrats.

But for all their incessant bashing, in voting across the country, Republicans showed themselves to be more centrist and more rational than they or I gave them credit for. Frankly, I'm shocked.

Maybe though, realizing that these same talkers were the ones who fired the country up for a war that most everyone, including them, regrets, the heartland of conservative Americans realizes it's time for an official who can mend the wounds, bring the country together, and make sure that American cities, like New Orleans, get more attention than Baghdad.

Maybe we were right when we called these hate talkers "right wing wackos." Maybe they really are a fringe element, not the silent, or noisy, majority they claim to be.

I've listened to this fringe for a decade, forgoing educational shows on NPR or entertainment on other stations, thinking that I had to monitor the wackos, fearing that, like Hitler, or the murderers in Rwanda, that the hate and divisiveness they preached could one day explode to a tyranny.

Maybe I was wrong.

I hope so.

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